Airofit BASIC

USD 86.00

Airofit BASIC is a simplified version of the Airofit Breathing Trainer, without smartphone support, and is made as a training aid for those at risk during the current pandemic in the world.

Airofit BASIC provides adjustable resistance levels to your breathing muscles, primarily the diaphragm and the intercostal muscles. Your breathing muscles respond to resistance training just like any other muscle group - they become stronger and more efficient.

A strong respiratory system makes you less receptacle to any pulmonary issues and diseases, including viral infections, lowering the risk of possible complications.

Note: The orders will be shipped within 10 days! Read why here.

COVID-19

COVID 19 is a severe Coronavirus infection, that infects the lungs causing symptoms
differing from mild cases. It causes fever, cough and shortness of breath, with severe cases causing pneumonia, kidney failure, and in the worst cases, death.

At the moment, the only treatment is supportive care. There is no specific medication and no vaccine.

Could breathing muscle training lower the risks associated with COVID-19 infection?

COVID-19 is a new disease, which means almost nothing is known about how to lower the risks associated with an infection. Consequently, there is no direct evidence, that having stronger breathing muscles reduces the impact of a COVID-19 infection. However, there is a strong theoretical rationale to support the idea that having stronger breathing muscles might lower a number of risks associated with the infection, including the requirement for mechanical ventilation in intensive care. This is based on the following assumptions:

1. The people most susceptible to serious medical consequences of COVID-19 infection, i.e., a requirement for mechanical ventilation in intensive care, are also those who are most likely to have weakest breathing muscles. It’s reasonable to assume that part of this increased risk might be attributable to factors linked to their breathing muscle weakness.

2. People need to be mechanically ventilated in intensive care because their breathing muscles are unable to meet the increased demands of breathing induced by the infection. It’s reasonable to assume that if your breathing muscles are stronger, you are less likely to require mechanical ventilation.

3. Existing studies exploring the effects of pre-operative breathing muscle training suggests that making the breathing muscles stronger reduces postoperative pulmonary complications, including infections such as pneumonia.

4. The support provided by mechanical ventilation causes the breathing muscles to become weaker, making it difficult for people to breathe unaided when they are removed from the support of the ventilator. There is some evidence that (it doesn’t take as long to ‘wean’ people from mechanical ventilation if you train their breathing muscles during the process. In addition, it is sensible to assume that if you start mechanical ventilation with stronger breathing muscles, then you will be less likely to be too weak to breathe on your own when the ventilator is removed.

Per Andersen on his experience with Airofit

Per Andersen is a physiotherapist who suffers from COPD. See how respiratory training has helped him manage his disease.

An assumption based upon the arguments outlined above is that strengthening your breathing muscles now makes it less likely you would require intensive care (mechanical ventilation) if/when you become infected with COVID-19. This would mean a reduction in the demand for mechanical ventilation within the healthcare system, freeing-up a scarce resource. More importantly for you, not requiring mechanical ventilation makes it much less likely that you would not survive COVID-19 infection.

A selection of studies that contain relevant medical evidence can be seen below:

Breathing muscle training reduces post-operative pulmonary complications
  1. Postoperative Inspiratory Muscle Training in Addition to Breathing Exercises and Early Mobilization Improves Oxygenation in High-Risk Patients After Lung Cancer Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial
  1. The effects of five days of intensive preoperative inspiratory muscle training on postoperative complications and outcome in patients having cardiac surgery: a randomized controlled trial
  1. Pre- and Postoperative Inspiratory Muscle Training in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
  1. Preoperative Inspiratory Muscle Training for Postoperative Pulmonary Complications in Adults Undergoing Cardiac and Major Abdominal Surgery
  1. Inspiratory Muscle Training Is Effective to Reduce Postoperative Pulmonary Complications and Length of Hospital Stay: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
  1. Seven-day Intensive Preoperative Rehabilitation for Elderly Patients With Lung Cancer: A Randomized Controlled Trial
  1. Postoperative Outcomes Following Preoperative Inspiratory Muscle Training in Patients Undergoing Open Cardiothoracic or Upper Abdominal Surgery: Protocol for a Systematic Review
  1. Preoperative intervention reduces postoperative pulmonary complications but not length of stay in cardiac surgical patients: a systematic review
  1. Effect of Preoperative Inspiratory Muscle Training on Alveolar-Arterial Oxygen Gradients After Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery
  1. Preoperative Inspiratory Muscle Training to Prevent Postoperative Pulmonary Complications in Patients Undergoing Esophageal Resection
  1. Comparison of Two Preoperative Inspiratory Muscle Training Programs to Prevent Pulmonary Complications in Patients Undergoing Esophagectomy: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study
  1. Reference chart of inspiratory muscle strength: a new tool to monitor the effect of pre-operative training
Breathing muscle training assists weaning from mechanical ventilation
  1. Prospective Observational Cohort Study on Grading the Severity of Postoperative Complications in Global Surgery Research
  1. Prospective Observational Cohort Study on Grading the Severity of Postoperative Complications in Global Surgery Research
  1. Inspiratory Muscle Training to Enhance Weaning From Mechanical Ventilation
  1. Inspiratory Muscle Training to Enhance Recovery From Mechanical Ventilation: A Randomised Trial
  1. Effect of Training on Inspiratory Load Compensation in Weaned and Unweaned Mechanically Ventilated ICU Patients
  1. IMT facilitates weaning from mechanical ventilation among patients in the intensive care unit: a systematic review
  1. Inspiratory Muscle Training to Facilitate Weaning From Mechanical Ventilation: Protocol for a Systematic Review
  1. IMT Increases Inspiratory Muscle Strength in Patients Weaning From Mechanical Ventilation: A Systematic Review
Mechanical ventilation weakens breathing muscles
  1. Effects of Mechanical Ventilation on Diaphragm Function and Biology
  1. Evolution of Diaphragm Thickness During Mechanical Ventilation. Impact of Inspiratory Effort
  1. Increased Duration of Mechanical Ventilation Is Associated With Decreased Diaphragmatic Force: A Prospective Observational Study

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